Controversiality in writing.

1aac6c360c0e5ffdfe47e48548992171.jpg

 

I recently was asked an opinion on a highly controversial piece written by a budding artist. They had questioned if putting in concepts like human trafficking, cult activities, racism, rape victims and genocide.

They were afraid that writing about these topics were going to offend someone or get them blacklisted. This was my response:

“Is this work fiction? If so, write it. Any and all issues should be discussed in literature. If you’re out to tell a story, it will thrive. If you’re just going to pander to an unseen audience, it will falter. Our most controversial books to date were written despite the threat of blacklisting. Our libraries honor them now.”

I was proud of the help I could give to this person, but I realized that I was falling into the same kind of situation. I had been debating for months with myself on certain parts of the book and if they were appropriate. It took reading a page in my own morality book to slap me back into work. These issues are something I believe are important. Issues and problems my own people deal with on a daily basis. If I don’t have the courage to stand up and write about them, despite the fear of reprisal, than nothing changes. If nothing changes, the people who suffer will continue to suffer. I will not allow that to happen.

 

Conflict is a necessity of every human being. Even if somehow we find a way to fix an issue or problem, there will be more to come. But that’s how we learn and grow. Fear of failure is a fear of learning. We MUST continue to strive to solve these challenges, and continue to expect more.

 

I don’t know about you, but that makes me excited! This wild ride never ends. Let’s get to it!

-Silver the Bard: “If you haven’t heard from me, assume I’m dead and avenge me.”